Categories

Music

The Jeremy Wallace Trio’s “Suitcase Suicide” smokes with its own brand of swagger, grit & humility.  He takes Willie Dixon’s “Back Door Man,” snarling and snaking through the song, until you forget it’s been covered by Howlin’ Wolf and the Doors. “You Might Do It Too” starts slow but feels fast with the blistering electric guitar, “When she got drunk, she’d take off her clothes; The evening was warm and she was calling me in; The water was cool, tasted sweet on her skin.” “Death Letter Blues” smokes relentlessly, making the blues rock and cry.  “Suicide Suitcase” is a brilliant set, one that was hinted at from his first two releases.

Back Door Man

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

You Might Do It Too

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


For She Used to Call Me Honey, Wallace has turned to experimenting with the sonic landscape of his music, pushing the boundaries and expectations of what a singer-songwriter can accomplish in both the studio and as a live performer. Edgy, dangerous and with a greater emphasis on the raw energy of his craft, Wallace has emerged with a stunning album that both diverges from, and compliments, his previous material. Sharper, with restrained power and vibrant honesty, his new songs capture Wallace’s most personal and creative work to date.

Gotta Get Back

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Samson and Delilah

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

I’m Your Man

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Wallace’s first record, My Lucky Day, (Palmetto Records) is an exploration of his blues and folk influences. With clever imagery and traditional arrangements, the album featured both spirited anthems of lost love and haunting melodies of wistful redemption. Songs such as “$1.49”, “Johnny”, and “See You in September” best represent Wallace at his most heartfelt and inspired.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

“The best art is often dangerous, and Wallace’s art is dangerous in the same way Lou Reed is dangerous. He writes so well, he almost makes you believe his self-destructive lifestyle is a romantic deal.” -DON WILCOX-The Record-Troy, NY.